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Scots pine

Pin SylvestreScots Pine / Pinus Sylvestris
4,30 € / 35g
Buds
Origin: Auvergne, France

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Scots Pine is a species of pine that grows all over Europe. It has been used on the European continent since thousands of years and historically it figures in greek mythology as well as in Druid tradition. Its fragrant buds are traditionally used for infusions, still being collected by several peoples every spring.

Use and advices:

Infusion
Infuse 1 teaspoon of Pine buds per teacup and let them steep in 80ºC water for 7-8 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips. This infusion goes particularly well together with a tablespoon of honey in your cup.

1-3 cups / day

Precautions: 

  • Scots Pine might provoke allergic reactions by hypersensitive people.
  • Follow recommended intake and do not over consume.
  • It is not recommended to use Scots Pine during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Harvesting advice:

Scots pine buds can be harvested in two different periods of the year: in the end of the winter or in the late autumn. Harvest on a dry and warm day, and always in clean areas. Do not take whole branches or parts of the branch with you, only the buds. Spread your harvest on several trees to avoid taking too much from single specimens. As with all wild harvesting, make certain of your identification of the tree prior to collecting and consuming.


The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Pansy

PenséePansy / Viola Tricolor
4,10 € / 20g
Dried aerial flowered part
Origin: Auvergne, France

Interested in ordering? Please contact us with your list of products. More information under the contact us-page.

The Pancy is surrounded by many stories and has a strong folk bond in Europe. Furthermore, the Ancient Greeks considered the Pansy as a symbol of fertility and love, and the Celts made a tea from the dried leaves and used it as a Love potion. Today it remains one of our most beloved flowers.

Use and advices:

Infusion
1,5 g dried pansy
200 ml d’eau

Infuse the dried Pansy in a teacup by letting it steep in 70-80ºC water, for 7-8 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips.

1-3 cups / day

Precautions:

  • Do not use Pansy during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • Pansy is not recommended for children.
  • Pansy may interact with medication treating hypertension and diuretic drugs.

The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Blueberry

MyrtilleBlueberry / Vaccinium Myrtillus
5,90 € / 35 g
Dried aerial parts and berries
Origin: Auvergne, France

Blueberry has been used in Europe since the middle ages. Although very useful for seniors, it is also a plant that is appreciated by children.

Its delicious fruit is famous for its antioxidants, but its leaves are also useful. This infusion combines both. Cherry on the cake – you can eat the rehydrated blueberries at the end of your tasting!

Use and advices:

Infusion
5 g of dried leaves
1 liters of water

Infuse the leaves in a casserole with 1 liter of water. Heat up to about 90-100 ºC and let steep for 10 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips.

1-2 cups / day

Precautions:

  • Blueberry leaves might affect the blood sugar level, be aware in case of diabetes.
  • Blueberry infusion is not recommended for women who breastfeed.

Harvesting advice:

Blueberry leaves can be harvested during almost the whole vegetative period of the plant, but best is before the fruits form. Harvest on a dry and warm day, and always in clean areas. Avoid collecting close to paths since it is likely more frequently exposed to animal excrements. As with all wild plant harvesting, make certain of your identification of the plant prior to collecting and consuming.


The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Common Mallow

MauveCommon Mallow / Malva Sylvestris
5,90 € / 15 g
Dried flowers and leaves
Origin: Auvergne, France

 Interested in ordering? Please contact us with your list of products. More information under the contact us-page.

The Common Mallow is renowned to be one of the favorite plants of Hippocrates. It was also often included in rare plant gardens during the middle ages.

Use and advices:

Infuse one teaspoon of dried herb per teacup, and let steep in 70-80ºC water for about 7 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips.

1-3 cups / day

Precautions: 

  • Follow recommended intake. Do not overdose your use.

The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Raspberry

FramboisierRaspberry / Rubus Idaeus
3,50 € / 20g
Dried leaves
Origin: Auvergne, France

Interested in ordering? Please contact us with your list of products. More information under the contact us-page.

Raspberry is mentioned already in ancient Greek mythology, and the use of both leaves and fruit goes far back in folk tradition.

Use and advices:

Infuse 1-2 tablespoons of dried raspberry leaves per teacup and let it steep in 70-80ºC water, for about 6-7 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips.

1-2 cups/day

Precautions:

  • Follow recommended intake.
  • The tannins in the Raspberry might affect the absorption of certain minerals, like iron. If you suffer from a lack of minerals and are following a treatment, you should discuss the use of Raspberry with your health care provider.

The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Blackcurrant

CassissierBlackcurrant / Ribes Nigrum
4,40 € / 20g
Dried leaves
Origin: Auvergne, France

Interested in ordering? Please contact us with your list of products. More information under the contact us-page.

Mostly known for its berries, the fragrant Blackcurrant leaves have also been used in herbal traditions since a long time.

Use and advices:

Infusion
Infuse 1-2 tablespoons of dried leaves per teacup and let them steep in 80ºC water for about 7 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips.

1-3 cups/day. We recommend not to drink blackcurrant infusion just before bedtime.

Precautions:

  • Blackcurrant is not recommended for pregnant women.

The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Chamomile

camomille-matricaireChamomile / Matricaria Recutita
Available in the future
Dried flowers
Origin: Auvergne, France

Chamomile has been used in herbal tradition for thousands of years, known in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome.

Use and advices:

Infusion:
Put 1-2 tablespoons of dried flowers in a teacup and let them steep in 70-80ºC water for 7-8 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips.

Precautions: 

  • If you are allergic / sensible towards other plants in the family of Asteraceae you should be careful or avoid Chamomile.
  • Discuss the use of Chamomile with your healthcare provider if you use sedative medicine.
  • Avoid combining Chamomile with the use of anticoagulants.

Yarrow

AchilléeYarrow / Achillea Millefolium
2,70 € / 20g
Dried flowers
Origin: Auvergne, France

 Interested in ordering? Please contact us with your list of products. More information under the contact us-page.

This plant is said to be known by man since the age of the Neanderthals. It was also included in some of the soldiers of world war one’s emergency kit.

Use and advices:

Infusion
Infuse two tablespoons of dried flowers per teacup and let them steep in 70-80ºC water for 7-8 minutes before enjoying. We always recommend drinking herbal infusions in slow sips.

1-3 cups/day

Precautions:

  • Do not use Yarrow during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • Yarrow is not recommended for children.
  • Yarrow may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with other anticoagulants.
  • Persons allergic to plants in the family of Asteraceaes may get skin irritation from contact with the plant.

Harvesting advice:

Yarrow is harvested when it is in full flower, usually a period stretching over the whole summer. Even though the leaves are edible, it is the flowers that are the most interesting to collect. Harvest on a dry and warm day, and always in clean areas. This flower often has particularly many tiny insects in its crown, so leave the flowers in a place where these can come out and go away by themselves, prior to placing them in the final drying area. As with all wild plant harvesting, make certain of your identification of the Yarrow prior to collecting and consuming.


The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Meadowsweet

Reine des PrésMeadowsweet/
Filipendula Ulmaria
3 € / 20g
Flowers
Origin: Auvergne, France

Interested in ordering? Please contact us with your list of products. More information under the contact us-page.

Meadowsweet, or queen of the meadow as it is also often called, is a fragrant plant that possesses a characteristic pleasant flavor and scent. It has been used for centuries as a medicinal plant, and was considered as one of the three most sacred herbs of the Druids. As researchers in modern times started to turn to traditional folk medicine to uncover various plants scientific base to their remedial effects, meadowsweet came into the spotlight. As the herb naturally contains salicylates, salicylic acid was first isolated from it in 1938, to later be synthesized in to making aspirin. This herb is much more than its active ingredients though. You can read more about it in the following links:
The anti-inflamatory properties of meadowsweet
Healing Herbs: Meadowsweet

Use and advice:

Therapeutical infusion
Infuse 4-6 g of dried meadowsweet in 3-4 dl of 60ºC water, for 15 minutes. Drink in slow sips, three cups/ day. If you wish to drink the infusion only to enjoy its taste you can decrease the time of infusion to half.
Once cold, this infusion can be used externally as an eyewash, or applied on the skin as a soothing compress.

1-3 cups/day.

Precautions:

  • Meadowsweet should not be used by persons who has salicylate or sulfite sensitivity.
  • Persons with asthma should avoid taking Meadowsweet since it may worsen symptoms.
  • Avoid use during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
  • Meadowsweet may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with other anticoagulants.
  • Avoid giving to children under the age of 16 suffering from fever or flue.

Harvesting advice:

Meadowsweet is harvested when it is in full flower, usually in the middle of the summer. The upper part of the plant with the flowers is the most interesting to collect. Harvest on a dry and warm day, and always in clean areas. As with all wild plant harvesting, make certain of your identification of the plant prior to collecting and consuming.


The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.

Stinging Nettle

OrtieStinging Nettle / Urtica Dioica
4 € /20g
Dried aerial parts
Origin: Auvergne, France

Interested in ordering? Please contact us with your list of products. More information under the contact us-page.

The Stinging Nettle has been used by peoples all over the world since ancient times for medicinal preparations, food and fiber. It is often referred to as “the herb of a thousand vertues” because of its many beneficial properties and uses. Many ancient herbal remedies contains this multifaceted plant.
Please read more about the benefits of the stinging nettle by your own research on the internet. You can also learn more in the following link:
University of Maryland, Stinging Nettle

Use and advice:
To enjoy Nettle in a general way, sprinkle 2-3 tablespoons of it on your breakfasts, let it jump in a smoothie or spread it over a meal. Store the product in a dark and cool place.

Infusion
Infuse 2-3 tablespoons of dried Nettle per teacup and let it steep in 70-80ºC water for about 7-8 minutes before enjoying

If taken as a preventive cure, drink 3 cups a day during at least three weeks. Otherwise our general recommendation is 1-3 cups daily. This infusion can also be applied externally to cuts and wounds, insects bites and burns to sooth the skin.

Nettle hair rinse
4 tablespoons of dried Nettle
4 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar (optional)
1 teaspoon of honey (optional)
1 liter of water

Put the Nettle flakes in a jar, pour over boiling water and the apple cider vinegar. Cover with a lid for 30 minutes. Then add honey and infuse another 30 minutes. Strain the infusion and rinse your hair with this mixture, gently massaging your scalp in the same time. Give your hair a quick rinse with cool water to finish.

Precautions:

  • Stinging Nettle may affect your blood sugar level, be aware in case of diabetes.
  • Stinging Nettle can lower the blood pressure. Be aware if you already use blood pressure medicine or if you have trouble with low blood pressure.
  • The Stinging Nettle seem to increase urine flow and acts like a diuretic. Discuss the use of the plant with your health care provider if you have kidney troubles.
  • Sedative medicines can interact with Stinging Nettle taken in large amounts. Do not overdose your use of Nettles.

Harvesting advice:

Nettels can be harvested during their whole vegetative period, but the best time varies a little with the use. If you wish to make fresh juice the spring and early summer is the best time. For drying and making powder they can be harvested from early spring until flowering.  After the seeding has begun, the plant quickly looses in vitality. Young plants can be used whole, and thereafter the best is to only use the leaves.
Be sure to pick in clean areas. Nettles often grows nearby human settlements, but they also easily assimilate heavy metals.
As with all wild harvesting, it is important to correctly identify the plant before collecting and consuming.


The availability of the plants that we propose can vary during the year, as nature itself changes with the season, and our stock. If you require large quantities, please contact us in advance.